Iran raps Int’l bodies, Europe for lack of cooperation in fighting drugs

FNA – Iranian Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli blasted the relevant international bodies and the European states for lack of cooperation in fighting drug trafficking, and expressed surprise that drug lords and cartels have been keeping billions of dollars in the western banks despite the West’s claims about campaign against money-laundering.

“While the Islamic Republic of Iran alone is running a fight against drugs on behalf of the world, none of the international organizations and the European states have acted based on their responsibilities in this regard,” Rahmani Fazli said, addressing a meeting with the Iranian envoys to foreign states in Tehran on Wednesday.

He added that Iran has last year discovered and seized 1,200 tons of different types of narcotics, including 830 tons of opium, in clashes with drug traffickers which inflicted damage and tolls on the Iranian forces.

Rahmani Fazli said while the western states claim to be fighting money-laundering, the turnover of drug money in their banks stands at $60bln and these countries do not release any information about their fight against money-laundering.

Pakistan and Afghanistan are two origins of producing and trafficking of various types of narcotic in the region.

The anti-drug squads of the Iranian Law Enforcement Police have intensified their countrywide campaign against drug-trafficking through staging long-term systematic operations since 2010.

The Iranian anti-narcotic police have always staged periodic, but short-term, operations against drug traffickers and dealers, but the latest reports – which among others indicate an improved and systematic dissemination of information – reveal that the world’s most forefront and dedicated anti-narcotic force (as UN drug-campaign assessments put it) has embarked on a long-term countrywide plan to crack down on the drug trade since 7 years ago.

The Iranian police officials maintain that drug production in Afghanistan has undergone a 40-fold increase since the US-led invasion of the country in 2001.

Afghan and western officials blame Washington and NATO for the change, saying that allies have “overlooked” the drug problem since invading the country more than 16 years ago.