Spokesman: Iran not to surrender to West’s pressures

FNA- Spokesman of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Behrouz Kamalvandi underlined that western attempts to revive sanctions to pressure Tehran to withdraw from its positions are futile.

“The other side has focused all its attempts to revive one of the 6 past resolutions to return to the pre-sanctions era but in my view, it is definitely mistaken,” Kamalvandi said on Sunday.

He also underscored Iran’s opposition to any change in the 2015 nuclear deal and talks on its missile and defense issues.

Kamalvandi stressed that Iran has succeeded in making the West accept that it will continue its plans and policies through resistance and insistence on its rights.

In relevant remarks earlier this month, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani underlined that the western countries will regret violation of the nuclear deal more than anyone else as it proves to be against their interests.

“Everyone will regret the possible collapse of the landmark nuclear agreement reached between Iran and the Group 5+1 (the US, Russia, China, France and Britain plus Germany) in Vienna in July 2015 as the US continues its efforts to sabotage the deal and issues threats to pull out of it,” President Rouhani said in a meeting with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian in Tehran last Monday.

He reiterated that it is imperative to save the nuclear agreement, officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), in order to improve regional security, stability and cooperation.

“Of course, we will be ready for any conditions, which would not be favorable to us,” the Iranian president added.

“The survival of the JCPOA will prove to the world that negotiations and diplomacy are the best options to solve problems,” President Rouhani said.

He, however, warned that any collapse of the nuclear deal would mean that political negotiations are a waste of time.

Iran and the Group 5+1 finalized the nuclear accord in July 2015 and started implementing it in January 2016.

Under the deal, Iran undertook to apply certain limits to its nuclear program in exchange for the termination of all nuclear-related sanctions against Tehran.

US President Donald Trump on January 12 reluctantly agreed to waive sanctions against Iran that were lifted as part of the landmark deal, but said it would be the last time he issued such a waiver unless conditions were met.

Trump said he wanted Congress and America’s European allies to use the 120-day period before sanctions relief once again comes up for renewal to agree to tougher measures and new conditions; otherwise Washington would pull out of the deal.