Study: Trees prevent respiratory diseases

A new research has suggested that trees play significant role in removing air pollution and preventing respiratory diseases.

A large scale study conducted by the researchers of several centers unveils that trees save more than 850 people lives and prevent 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms annually.
The research focused on the effects of trees air pollution removal and people’s health.

The investigation shows that trees can remove air pollution and improve the air quality up to average standards.

Researchers valued the human health effects of the reduced air pollution at nearly $7 billion every year, according to the study published recently in the journal Environmental Pollution.

The study also unraveled that “pollution removal is substantially higher in rural parts than urban areas; however the effects on human health are substantially greater in urban areas than rural areas.”

The study examined four pollutants including nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter.

The pollutants were considered to be measured for air quality standards at the research centers.

The impact of pollution on health was investigated through pulmonary, cardiac, vascular, and neurological systems.

The study was carried by Dave Nowak and Eric Greenfield of the US Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and Satoshi Hirabayashi and Allison Bodine of the Davey Institute.

“In terms of impacts on human health, trees in urban areas are substantially more important than rural trees due to their proximity to people,” Nowak said.

We found that in general, the greater the tree cover, the greater the pollution removal, and the greater the removal and population density, the greater the value of human health benefits.” Nowak added.

By Press TV

 

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