Iran commemorates National Persian Gulf Day

TEHRAN, April 30 (MNA) – April 30 marks the anniversary of the expulsion of Portuguese military forces from the Strait of Hormuz in 1622. The day has been designated as the National Persian Gulf Day to highlight its historical identity.

April 30 marks the anniversary of the expulsion of Portuguese military forces from the Strait of Hormuz in 1622. The day has been designated as the National Persian Gulf Day to highlight its historical identity.

Following is a documentary providing documents related to Persian Gulf historical background. It is an episode produced by Persian Gulf – in Persian Khalij-e Fars – TV channel of Bandar Abbas.

Regions from Rudan to Mesopotamia and Persian Gulf have been the cradle of civilization of mankind since long time back.

Such civilizations as Sumer, Babel, Elam and Mede have been among the governments which have been developed there before Achaemenid civilization in the region.

Iranians familiarity with navigation and their settlement in Persian Gulf shores made them find out the importance of marine business and take actions to facilitate commerce since Cyrus region. These action entered a new era when Darius held power in 522 BC.

With respect to marine business and sufficient knowledge in this field in 497 BC Darius ordered a canal to be dug in site of present Suez Canal.

In a comprehensive analysis of Darius’ manner Arnold Toynbee writes; with respect to these utilitarian strategies and arrangements as well as amazing providence it evident that Darius was fully aware of the importance of marine power in Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf and knew that in order to rule such a great government which is situated on Middle East land bridge how important it is to be master of shipping on the Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf.

According to the available evidences in writings of Eratosthenes Strabo, Pliny and Herodotus, the Greek historian, it can be said that the northern part of Persian Gulf and Mesopotamia has been of great flourish and development when Sassanid dynasty held power since their native city was near Pars Sea, a new opinion about sea and navigation was developed the expansion of urbanization and villages in Persian Gulf was increased by the measures taken by Sassanid kings and the southern and northern shores of this important waterway accepted a large number of merchants and businessmen.

With respect to the qualities of Sassanid region there have been over eleven cities in Persian Gulf shores. The most important of them were Ray Shahr Siraf, Tooj, Oboleh or today’s Basreh, Sohar and Qalhat, today Oman and Bahrain Islands.

The oldest document which refers to the title of Persian Gulf or Pars Sea is the itinerary of Nyakhus, Alexander of Macedon’s commander form which three relatively similar narratives have been delivered to our era by Greek historians the most perfect of these narratives is Indiaka Book written by Flavius Arian, the historian of the 2nd century other narratives have been quoted by Pliny in his atural History Book.

In addition, Strabo has referred to some points in his Geography Book Nyakhus recorded the title of this waterway as Persian Gulf and stated that it is near Indian Ocean Eratosthenes is another geographer who existed in the 2nd century BC. However his geographical boos was not delivered to us, the content of his book was quoted by Strabo.

About Persian Gulf, Eratosthenes writes “Persian Gulf is also called Pars Sea, the entering opening of which is in a way that you can see the cape of Mecca in Saudi Arabia from Hormuz and Kerman. The total area of it is ten thousand Eastad (distance measure) and the shores of Kerman, Pars, Susa, and part of Babel is a portion of it. It is necessary to be explained that in that era Oman in Greek was called Mecca.

The oldest map that we have got was drawn on the basis of the content of Ptolemy’s book (1477), in which Pars Sea is clearly characterized.

By Mehr News Agency

 

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