NSA spied on 2010 G8, G20 summits in Toronto

Newly revealed documents show the US National Security Agency spied on the G8 and G20 summits held in the Canadian city of Toronto in 2010, with the help of the host country’s government.

Documents obtained from former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden show the US embassy in Ottawa turned into a command post for the six-day spying operation as US President Barack Obama and other foreign leaders met on Canadian soil, CBC News reported on Wednesday.

According to CBC News, the documents do not specify the targets of the US spying operation but show the operation was “closely coordinated with the Canadian partner.”

Moreover, the documents do not mention the precise role played by the NSA’s Canadian counterpart, the Communications Security Establishment of Canada (CSEC), in the Toronto spying.

Both the US and Canada belong to the ‘Five Eyes’ club, an intelligence sharing alliance including three other English-speaking countries, Britain, Australia, and New Zealand.

Previously disclosed documents also showed that the NSA, with the help of its British counterpart Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), monitored phone calls and email communications of foreign leaders and diplomats at the 2009 G20 summit in London.

It was also made public last month that Washington has been secretly using Australian embassies throughout Asia to intercept phone calls and collect data across the continent.

Since early June, documents after documents disclosed by Snowden have shed some light on the scope and scale of Washington’s spying activities across the globe.

The documents have shown how the US government collects phone records of all American citizens and tracks the use of US-based web servers by all people around the world.

Other documents also showed that US spy agencies hacked into the computer systems of other countries’ diplomatic missions and that Washington has been eavesdropping on phone calls of at least 35 world leaders including that of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, one of Europe’s most influential leaders.

By Press TV

 

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