Al-Shabaab is not Mining uranium in Somalia to sell to Iran

MNA – Cindy Vesterggard, a Senior Associate with the Nuclear Safeguards rejected a few conservative media outlets report on a letter by the Somali FM that Al-Shabaab was mining UOC for transport to Iran.

last week, a few conservative media outlets including Fox News and VOA ran a story on a letter by the Somali FM that Al-Shabaab was mining UOC for transport to Iran.

Fox news reported, “Al Qaeda affiliate mining uranium to send to Iran, Somali official warns US ambassador.” and VOA also said, “Somalia Seeks US Help, Says Militants Plot to Supply Uranium to Iran…the letter might be intended to draw additional military support from Washington more than anything else.”

To shed light on the fact of the matter, Cindy Vesterggard a Senior Associate with the Nuclear Safeguards program at the Stimson Center in an article published on the website of the center and then shared with Mehr News agency, denounced the reports.

According to Vesterggard, the letter sent by Somalia’s Foreign Minister Yusuf Garaad to the U.S. Ambassador of Somalia, Stephen Schwartz, on August 11 overstates the risk of nuclear proliferation as an attempt to bring the United States into what is a decades-long protracted, factional conflict further complicated by high food insecurity, terrorism and no functioning central government.

Providing additional background about Somalia’s uranium mines and its technical capabilities and equipment, she also says,” there are no operating uranium mines in Somalia, nor any plans to construct one. The country’s known reserves are small and highly expensive to extract with data largely based on geological mapping efforts done in the 1960s and 1970s. Today, mining activities in Somalia are described as small-scale and artisanal, mainly gemstones and salt production in Somaliland, a self-declared independent (but not internationally recognized) region of Somalia.

She notes, “any development of the minerals sector is complicated by Somalia’s grim security environment. Twenty-six years of war, famine, foreign intervention, and terrorism have left Somalia’s 12 million inhabitants hungry, acutely malnourished, and displaced with most of the population (73%) living on less than US$2 per day. Mogadishu and other towns are now under government control, but the situation is far too divided and violent for democratic elections — the last were held in 1969. Somalia is Africa’s most failed state and has been called “the worst place in the world.”

Denouncing the claim, Vesterggard continues, “the letter’s claim that Al-Shabaab, an Islamist militant group allied to al-Qaeda, is “strip mining triuranium octoxide” from “captured critical surface exposed uranium deposits in the Galmudug region” would suppose first that Al-Shabaab has an interest in excavating the land for uranium and secondly has the large industrial equipment, dump trucks, solvents and know-how to break and crush ore then extract and separate out uranium, and process it into a concentrate form for transport. No extremist group is known to have the resources for a mining operation, even if taking over an-already operational mine, nor would such an operation go unnoticed by intelligence agencies.”

She adds, “Lastly, the letter’s claim that Iran is the destination is a gross distortion even if al-Shabaab had the ability to mine uranium. The United Nations Security Council would know if uranium concentrates were being transferred to Iran. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) reached by Iran and six other powers (the United States, China, France, Germany, Russia, United Kingdom) plus the European Union in July 2015 monitors all transfers, trade and/or domestic production of uranium ore concentrates. Moreover, if Iran wanted to buy uranium it can do so openly through a ‘procurement channel’ established by the JCPOA and endorsed by United Nations Security Council resolution 2231 (2015) for States wanting to transfer nuclear or dual-use goods, technology or related services to Iran. All such activities are to be approved by the Security Council, including any acquisitions by Iran of an interest in a commercial activity in another State involving uranium mining or production of nuclear materials.”

Vesterggard concludes, “If the argument has an oddly familiar ring, it is because uranium — or rather the fear of it — was a key part of the justification by the George W. Bush Administration (and by U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair) for invading Iraq in 2003. The claim was discredited and eventually retracted by the White House four months after the United States had begun military operations in Baghdad.”

 

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