Yemen-crisis

On new day of campaign, Saudi jets kill more Yemenis

Press TV- At least 26 people have been killed in airstrikes by Saudi warplanes on a market in the western Yemeni province of Hudaydah.

The air raids that hit the market in Khawkhah district on Friday also left 10 people injured.

Yemen’s al-Masirah television had earlier reported that Saudi jets continued to fly over Khawkhah, preventing ambulances from reaching the victims.

Saudi Arabia also launched two air raids on Abu Musa military camp in the same district.

Meanwhile, Saudi warplanes bombarded Mandaba area in Baqim district in the province of Sa’ada. The province’s Kitaf district was also hit by an air raid.

Nihm district in Yemen’s capital, Sana’a, was also hit by air raids. The warplanes used internationally-banned cluster bombs in one of the strikes.

The news comes a day after Amnesty International slammed the Saudi regime and its allies for dropping cluster bombs on residential areas in Yemen despite global outcry against the use of such weapons by the Riyadh-led coalition.

Also on Friday, Saudi jets pounded the Yemeni provinces of Hajjah and Ta’izz.

People carry the coffin of a man who was killed in Saudi airstrikes during his funeral in the Old City of Sana’a, Yemen, January 28, 2017. (Photo by AP)

In retaliation for the Saudi aggression, Yemeni army and popular committees killed two Saudi soldiers and two other mercenaries in southwestern Saudi Arabia. Yemeni snipers killed the four in al-Shabaka military base in Najran.

Yemeni forces also targeted military positions in the Saudi provinces of Jizan and Asir.

Saudi Arabia began its deadly campaign against Yemen in late March 2015 in a bid to restore power to Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, Yemen’s president who has resigned and is backed by Riyadh. The campaign also sought to undermine the Houthi Ansarullah movement.

The Saudi aggression has claimed the lives of over 12,000 people, according to figures compiled by the Yemeni non-governmental monitoring group Legal Center for Rights and Development.